B.E. First Year – (Physics Group) – Elements of Mechanical Engineering

Lecture 1: Introduction to Refrigeration and Types

Refrigeration is a process of moving heat from one location to another in controlled conditions. The work of heat transport is traditionally driven by mechanical work, but can also be driven by heat, magnetism, electricity, laser, or other means.

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Lecture Notes
Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

Lecture Date:

Lecture 2: Properties and Uses of Refrigerants

  • Refrigerant R134a Properties – Thermodynamic properties refrigerant R-134a.
  • Freon Properties – Properties of saturated liquid Freon – CCl2F2 – density, specific heat capacity, kinematic viscosity, thermal conductivity and Prandtl number

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Lecture Notes
Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

Lecture Date:

Lecture 3: Uses of Refrigerants

Cooling Refrigerants. Refrigerants are what make air conditioning refrigeration  possible. Contained within the coils of an air conditioner, these liquid agents cool and dehumidify indoor air

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Lecture Notes
Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

Lecture Date:

Lecture 4: Vapour Compression Refrigeration

Vapor-compression refrigeration in which the refrigerant undergoes phase changes, is one of the many refrigeration cycles and is the most widely used method for air-conditioning of buildings and automobiles. It is also used in domestic and commercial refrigerators, large-scale warehouses for chilled or frozen storage of foods and meats, refrigerated trucks and railroad cars, and a host of other commercial and industrial services

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Lecture Notes
Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

Lecture Date:

Lecture 5: Vapour Absorption Refrigerator

An absorption refrigerator is a refrigerator that uses a heat source (e.g., solar energy, a fossil-fueled flame, waste heat from factories, or district heating systems) which provides the energy needed to drive the cooling process.

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Lecture Notes
Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

Lecture Date:

Lecture 6: Comparison between VCR and VAR

We have seen various types of absorption refrigeration systems like simple absorption cycle, ammonia-water absorption cycle and also the vapor compression refrigeration cycle. Let us see the comparison of the vapor absorption cycle and vapor compression cycle.

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Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

Lecture Date:

Lecture 7: Air Conditioning

Air conditioning (often referred to as ‘A/C’ or ‘AC’) is the process of altering the properties of air (primarily temperature and humidity) to more comfortable conditions, typically with the aim of distributing the conditioned air to an occupied space such as a building or a vehicle to improve thermal comfort and indoor air quality. In common use, an air conditioner is a device that lowers the air temperature.

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Lecture Notes
Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

Lecture Date:

Lecture 8: Principle of Air Conditioning

Air conditioning is the process whereby the condition of air, as defined by its temperature and moisture content, is changed. Note that in practice other factors must also be taken into account especially cleanliness; odour; velocity & distribution pattern.

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Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

Lecture Date:

Lecture 9: Psychrometric Properties

Psychrometrics or psychrometry or hygrometry are terms used to describe the field of engineering concerned with the determination of physical and thermodynamic properties of gas-vapor mixtures.

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Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

Lecture Date:

Lecture 10: Energy Sources

Energy development is a field of endeavor focused on making available sufficient primary energy sources and secondary energy forms to meet the needs of society. These endeavors encompass those which provide for the production of conventional, alternative and renewable sources of energy, and for the recovery and reuse of energy that would otherwise be wasted. Energy conservation and efficiency measures reduce the impact of energy development, and can have benefits to society with changes in economic cost and with changes in the environmental effects.

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Lecture Notes
Lecture By:

Rajashekhar

Assistant Professor

Lecture Date:

Lecture 11: Wind, Hydel and Solar energy

Renewable energy resources exist over wide geographical areas, in contrast to other energy sources, which are concentrated in a limited number of countries. Rapid deployment of renewable energy and energy efficiency is resulting in significant energy security, climate change mitigation, and economic benefits.

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Lecture Notes
Lecture By:

Rajashekhar

Assistant Professor

Lecture Date:

Lecture 12: Solar Energy and Solar Pond

Solar energy is radiant light and heat from the Sun harnessed using a range of ever-evolving technologies such as solar heating, photovoltaics, solar thermal energy, solar architecture and artificial photosynthesis

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Lecture By:

Rajashekhar

Assistant Professor

Lecture Date:

Lecture 13: Nuclear Energy

Nuclear power is the use of nuclear reactions that release nuclear energy to generate heat, which most frequently is then used in steam turbines to produce electricity in a nuclear power station. The term includes nuclear fission, nuclear decay and nuclear fusion. Presently, the nuclear fission of elements in the actinide series of the periodic table produce the vast majority of nuclear energy in the direct service of humankind, with nuclear decay processes, primarily in the form of geothermal energy, and radioisotope thermoelectric generators, in niche uses making up the rest.

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Lecture By:

Rajashekhar

Assistant Professor

Lecture Date:

Lecture 14: Fuels

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Lecture By:

Rajashekhar

Assistant Professor

Lecture Date:

Lecture 15: Steam Formation

Steam is water in the gas phase, which is formed when water boils. Steam is invisible; however, “steam” often refers to wet steam, the visible mist or aerosol of water droplets formed as this water vapor condenses. At lower pressures, such as in the upper atmosphere or at the top of high mountains, water boils at a lower temperature than the nominal 100 °C (212 °F) at standard temperature and pressure. If heated further it becomes superheated steam.

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Lecture By:

Rajashekhar

Assistant Professor

Lecture Date:

Lecture 16: Classification of Boilers

A boiler is a closed vessel in which water or other fluid is heated. The fluid does not necessarily boil. (In North America the term “furnace” is normally used if the purpose is not actually to boil the fluid.) The heated or vaporized fluid exits the boiler for use in various processes or heating applications

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Lecture Notes
Lecture By:

Rajashekhar

Assistant Professor

Lecture Date:

Lecture 17: Babcock and Wilcox Boiler

It is a water tube boiler used in steam power plants. In this, water is circulated inside the tubes and hot gases flow over the tubes.

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Lecture Notes
Lecture By:

Rajashekhar

Assistant Professor

Lecture Date:

Lecture 18: Lancashire Boiler

It is generally considered to be the invention of William Fairbairn in 1844, although his patent was for the method of firing the furnaces alternately, so as to reduce smoke, rather than the boiler itself. Stephenson’s early 0-4-0 locomotive “Lancashire Witch” had already demonstrated the use of twin furnace tubes within a boiler 15 years earlier

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Lecture Notes
Lecture By:

Rajashekhar

Assistant Professor

Lecture Date:

Lecture 19: Comparison Between Fire and Water tube Boilers

There are two main boiler types that you can choose from for your specific application; watertube and firetube boilers. Deciding which of these two types will work best for you is not as easy as it may seem. It is like comparing apples to oranges; you can’t simply compare prices with steam capacity, as there are significant differences to consider.

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Lecture Notes
Lecture By:

Rajashekhar

Assistant Professor

Lecture Date:

Lecture 20: Introduction to Engineering Materials

Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 21: Steels – classification

Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 22: Lead and its alloys

Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 23: Ceramic Matrix composites

Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 24: Application of Soldering

Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 25: Types of Brazing

Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 26: Edge Preparation in Welding

Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 27: Gas Welding Process

Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 28: Flames Produced in Oxy-Acetylene Process

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Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 29: Comparision of Welding, Soldering and Brazing

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Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 30: Introduction to Turbine

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Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 31: Comparision of Impulse and Reaction turbine

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Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 32: Hydraulic Turbines

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Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 33: Kaplan Turbine

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Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 34: Open/Closed Cycle Gas Turbine

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Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 35: Parts of IC Engine

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Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 36: Four Stroke Engines

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Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 37: Four Stroke Diesel Engine

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Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 38: Four Stroke Petrol vs Diesel Engines

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Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 39: Four Stroke Petrol vs Diesel Engines

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Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 40: Indicated and Break Power

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Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 41: Machine Tools – Introduction and Operations on Lathe

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Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 42: Operations on Lathe (Cont.,)

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Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 43: Drilling Operations

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Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 44: Drilling Operations (Cont.,)

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Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 45: Milling and Milling Operations

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Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 46: Milling Operations (Cont.,)

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Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 47: Introduction to Automation

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Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 48: Introduction to NC Machines

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Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 49: NC Machines (Cont.,)

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Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 50: Difference Between NC-CNC, Robotics

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Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 51: Robot – Configurations

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Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

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Lecture 52: Advantages, Disadvantages and Applications of Robotics

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Lecture By:

Dr. CNV Sridhar

Professor

Lecture Date:

Assignments

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Bibliography

  1. 1. V.K.Manglik, “Elements of Mechanical Engineering”, PHI Publications, 2013. (Module-1,2,4,5)
  2. 2. MikellP.Groover, “Automation, Production Systems & CIM”, 3rd Edition, PHI (Module -3)
  3. 3. K.R.Gopalkrishna, “A text Book of Elements of Mechanical Engineering”- Subhash Publishers, Bangalore. (Module -1,2,3,4,5)

References

. S.TrymbakaMurthy, “A Text Book of Elements of Mechanical Engineering”, 4th Edition 2006, Universities Press (India) Pvt Ltd, Hyderabad.

2. K.P.Roy, S.K.HajraChoudhury, Nirjhar Roy, “Elements of Mechanical Engineering”, Media Promoters & Publishers Pvt Ltd,Mumbai,7th Edition,2012

3. Pravin Kumar, “Basic Mechanical Engineering”, 2013 Edition, Pearson.